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SSL Certificate Information

SSL Certificate Information


An SSL Certificate is responsible for creating secure communication between client and server. Bluehost provides a free shared SSL Certificate available to all accounts residing on a shared IP address.

What is an SSL Certificate

SSL is the Secure Socket Layer protocol which is responsible for creating secure communication between client and server. This is done by both server and client authentication and the negotiation of an encryption algorithm and cryptographic keys.

Internet users associate SSL with the padlock that appears in your browser's address bar when you enter the secure area of a website. They know to look for this before entering any personal or financial information online. If information is entered on an unsecured website, the data is transmitted from your computer to the webserver un-encrypted and viewable in plain text. Anyone 'sniffing' packets on the network or on the internet can capture your information and use it fraudulently.

Bluehost does provide a free shared SSL Certificate available to all accounts residing on a shared IP address. For more information about the Shared SSL Certificate, Click Here.

To utilize the SSL protocol with your domain, the Bluehost server needs to have a Private (non-shared) SSL Certificate installed specifically for your domain. This can only be done if your account has a Dedicated IP address. For information about purchasing a Dedicated IP address, please Click Here.

Please note, for Standard and Pro accounts, you can only have one Dedicated IP and one SSL Certificate. This is because you will have only one cPanel. For VPS, dedicated, and reseller accounts, you can have multiple Dedicated IP and SSL Certificates because you can create multiple cPanels within your account.

Once you have purchased a Dedicated IP for your Bluehost account, you may continue with one of the following knowledgebase articles:

Note: SSL Certificates are domain specific. When renaming the main domain please be aware that the SSL Certificate for the old main domain will not work after the rename process. The new main domain name will require a new SSL Certificate.

Note: Since SSL Certificates are Domain/IP specific, you must first Purchase a Dedicated IP before purchasing or having an SSL Certificate installed on your account. They will NOT work with a shared IP address.

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